Around the Dial: Database Update, O’Brien Crosses 450

Data Overload: The database of network television broadcasts has been updated through the end of May and now includes 10,465 games. The list of most common announcers is up to date as well.

The year’s first national-TV rainout struck Saturday night in Chicago, wiping out the Royals-Cubs tilt until Monday, Sept. 28. That deprived Cubs TV voice Len Kasper of his third chance to work on Fox and C.J. Nitkowski of his 13th.

Dave O’Brien became the seventh man to handle 450 national telecasts when he did the Yankees-Orioles game for ESPN. He’s the third person to hit that milestone on play-by-play, following Jon Miller and Joe Buck.

The next active play-by-play man on that list is Dan Shulman of ESPN with 374 games. Shulman will be off next week, however, as he coaches his son’s baseball team. Karl Ravech steps in for that game, and Mark Mulder will replace Curt Schilling, who’s headed to Oklahoma City to analyze the Women’s College World Series.

Speaking of ESPN and unusual commentator assignments, the Worldwide Leader will deploy “The Shift” on Wednesday night for the Dodgers-Rockies game. Jon Sciambi and pitching analyst Rick Sutcliffe will work from the box, with Eric Wedge (managing) and Eduardo Perez (hitting) in the dugout-level camera wells. Fielding analyst Doug Glanville gets set up in the outfield stands. The entire exercise strikes me as an attempt to mask quality with quantity (except for Glanville, who can hold his own with any broadcast partner out there), but obviously ESPN believes it works for them.

The National Pastime at All Hours of the Night: A pair of national broadcasts this season have taken a page from the Paul Simon playbook, going “Late in the Evening.” The Royals and Tigers played till 1:16 a.m. on May 10 after a 103-minute deluge (and an extra-inning game to boot).

A month earlier, Bob Costas and John Smoltz outlasted the late-night talk shows as they called a 19-inning Red Sox-Yankees game on MLB Network. That game ran almost seven hours, longer if you include a delay to fix a twelfth-inning power outage. The 2:13 a.m. finish was the second-latest in the database, following only a 2:26 (EDT) conclusion to Game 3 of the 1998 Rangers/Yankees Division Series, and that game had a 3:16 rain delay.

On This Date…

June 7 will mark 51 years since Pee Wee Reese became the most common national television analyst in MLB history, unseating Buddy Blattner. Reese held that crown until Tony Kubek passed him in 1974.

Eleven years ago on June 14, Michael Reghi and Frank Viola went off the air from Citizens Bank Park at 2:03 a.m. Their Reds/Phillies game, an ESPN broadcast, was delayed three times by rain.

On June 17, 1978, Kubek worked his 449th national telecast, passing Dizzy Dean for the most in MLB history.

We’ll cut off the list there for the moment, in anticipation of a couple anniversaries later in the month that deserve more than two sentences of recognition.

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