Category Archives: Journalism

The AP Will Provide ‘Faster, More Engaging’ Game Summaries Starting 7/28/14

News from the print world this week is that the Associated Press will substantially change the way they write up games after they are played.  Instead of chronicling “every big play, every no-hitter and every controversy on the field during the hundreds of games that make up the major league baseball season”, AP will go to a “shorter, … faster” format meant to better engage readers in this ever accelerating world of ours.  (No quote marks on that last one, there—that one’s pure Chuck.)

Here’s how writeups will change:

The basics won’t change: We will continue to publish a NewsNow at game’s end, a 300-word writethru shortly after, followed by a 600-word writethru and a hometown lead.

What will change is how those stories look. The top of the story will continue to look like a traditional AP game story. After 300 words, the text will break into a chunky-text presentation featuring up to five bullet points that explain team storylines, key plays, injuries and a look ahead to what’s next for a team or player.

A “chunky-text presentation”, which looks to be a uniquely AP appellation coined specifically for this press release, appears to occur when a story breaks into short paragraphs set off by in-story headline-like phrases in capital letters, like so:

TIPPING PITCHES?

One night after Cleveland’s struggling right-hander Danny Salazar said he might be tipping his pitches, Indians manager Terry Francona said the 24-year-old Salazar is just leaving too many over the plate. Francona was surprised Salazar would say he was giving hitters clues.

“He’s not,” Francona said. “There were some instances last year in spring training that we kind of addressed with him. But, no, we really keep an eye on that.”

SLUMPS

Royals: Perez snapped an 0-for-22 slump with a drive over the center field wall off Masterson in the second inning for his first homer. The Royals catcher with a .295 average in three-plus seasons entered batting just .211 in 71 at-bats.

Indians: Third baseman-designated hitter Carlos Santana is in a 2-for-46 (.043) slide.

Both Ed Sherman (he of the eponymous Report) and Joe Lucia (at Fang’s Bites) like the idea, believing this change will make it easier for readers to digest (no more “meaningless information” that means nothing to the game’s bottom line) and for AP writers to whip up (less time-consuming and more opportunity for creative writing).  OK, we’ll go with that opinion as well.

Read more here:

A faster, new format for AP’s Major League Baseball game stories

Associated Press to go to bullet style for baseball game stories

THE AP IS CHANGING THEIR GAME STORY FORMAT

Rangers Beat Writer Durrett Dead at 38

Richard Durrett, a Texas Rangers beat writer for ESPNDallas.com, passed away Tuesday at the age of 38.  The cause of death has not yet been officially announced, but reports unconfirmed as of Wednesday mid-afternoon are that the cause was a brain aneurysm.  Services are pending.

ESPNDallas.com Richard Durrett died Tuesday at the age of 38.

Prior to joining ESPN in September 2009, Durrett was at The Dallas Morning News for nine years, and was previously sports editor at the Record-Chronicle in Denton, Texas. In addition, he hosted a radio show on ESPN Dallas 103.3 FM with Ian Fitzsimmons for a number of years.

It is always jarring to hear of anyone so young dying so suddenly, and at the hand of a cause that could happen to anyone anytime, and which strikes without warning.   Durrett is survived by his wife, Kelly, and two children.  If you are inclined to, you can say a prayer or hold a good thought for his survivors.  Or, if you are more into action than thoughts, you can donate to a fund set up to benefit the Durrett family on the Rangers website, at texasrangers.com/foundation.

Read more about this story here:

ESPN Dallas’ Richard Durrett dies suddenly at age 38

ESPN Dallas’ Richard Durrett dies

Richard Durrett has left us too soon

Pablo Sandoval Owes Reds Beat Reporter A New Laptop

Well, this is a hell of an occupational hazard for a baseball beat reporter.

During the top of the eighth inning of Tuesday night’s Giants/Reds tilt in Cincinnati, Pablo Sandoval fouled one up into the press box.  There are lots of targets up there, and the ball found one in Mark Sheldon’s Thinkpad.

Check out the priceless reaction:

 

Sheldon’s subsequent tweet indicates a confirmed kill:

The Reds won the game, 8-3, although it’s a little unclear as to how Sheldon communicated as much to MLB.com.

(h/t Business Insider)