Tag Archives: New York Yankees

Here is the Actual 1939 Contract That Ended the Baseball Broadcast Moratorium For Good

Yesterday we posted a 1932 article published by the Sporting News revealing the results of a poll the paper took of their readers as to the latter’s feelings about broadcasting games live on the radio.  Almost 260,000 votes were cast, with the Sporting News concluding that public opinion in favor of live broadcasts was “practically unanimous”.

This overwhelming fan sentiment did not prevent eight of the sixteen teams from banning broadcasts of their games by local radio stations the following season.  (In fact, the Indians ended up dropping radio in 1933 before picking it up again for the 1934 campaign.) But eventually the teams and the leagues did come to see the light, and that light led them to enter into the Major League Broadcasting Agreement just prior to the 1939 season.

So, what did this Major League Broadcasting Agreement actually look like?  What were its provisions, and what practices did it allow and forbid?  Fortunately for us, this is something we can see for ourselves, thanks to the miracle that is the Internet.  Goldin Auctions, a company that conducts auctions of sports memorabilia, had conducted one consisting specifically of baseball documents this past August, and which included a signed copy of this 1939 broadcasting agreement, complete with original signatures from representatives of all 16 clubs, including many club presidents who are still well-known today.

A certificate of authentication included with the auction lot indicated that the agreement was executed on 20 copies, each signed by all 16 team representatives, and the web page on which the auction was conducted indicates that the winner paid $23,800 to add the document to his or her collection.

However, the best part about all of this is that there are .JPG files for each page of the document on that web page.  You can go there and peruse the entire agreement if you like—or you can simply click on the images below to see and read the document.

Having read the agreement myself, I am struck by how short and simple it is by today’s standards.  Even allowing for names of the participating parties and for definition of terms, it looks like they were able to bring in the entire agreement under 2,000 words. By contrast, the iTunes Store terms and Conditions yawns on interminably for over 20,000 words.

Secondly, there are several interesting aspects to the agreement that I think are worth mentioning here:

  • The agreement prevented a team from broadcasting its games on any radio stations located within fifty miles of any other team’s stadium.
  • In two-team cities, the agreement prevented one team from broadcasting any of its games as long as the other team was playing a home game, at least until that other team’s game had concluded.
  • The New York Giants and New York Yankees together constituted a two-team territory, but the Brooklyn Dodgers, only about a dozen miles away and even then technically located within New York City for the prior 40 years, constituted its own one-team territory.  So, if the Giants were away and the Yankees were at home, the Giants could not broadcast its away game (and vice versa, of course).  However, if the Giants and the Yankees were both away, the Giants could broadcast its away game even if the Dodgers were playing a home game.
  • The agreement specified that ball clubs could broadcast only between 550 and 1600 on the AM band, but specifically forbade broadcasting on shortwave or other “high frequency” stations.  (FM was not contemplated because the first FM station in a major league city did not sign on until that November.)
  • The agreement defined “broadcasting” as including not only radio, but telephone.
  • The corporate name of the New York Giants was the very bland-sounding “National Exhibition Company” and were, in fact, incorporated in New jersey.  And the best part of that is, they maintained this corporate name long after they moved to San Francisco!

After this agreement was signed onto, no baseball team ever again refused to broadcast its games live for any reason other than financial. (As it happens, both the Giants and Yankees did not air their games during the 1941 and 1943 seasons due to inability to sell broadcasting rights for what they deemed to be their minimum asking price).

Click on any of the images below to open them in a new tab.  Enjoy!

 

16927_Cover

16927_1 16927_2-3 16927_4-5 16927_6-7 16927_8-916927_10

The Humble (Ad-Free!) Origins of the First World Series Broadcasts

Committee member James Walker, author of such seminal baseball media books as Center Field Shot and the recently released Crack of the Bat, just published a terrific new article over at The Conversation about the origins of World Series broadcasts, the first of which took place in 1921.  Dr. Walker volunteered to us the article for a reprint in its entirety, and so we have, below.

There are some revelations that will surprise us media-savvy consumers of the early 21st Century, not the least of which is the commercial- and broadcast rights fee-free nature of those early broadcasts.  Another significant difference from today’s broadcasts is the multiple network coverage of the Series, as CBS joined NBC in broadcasting the Fall Classic in 1927, with Mutual becoming the third radio network to do so simultaneously starting in 1935.  Both these circumstances yielded a permanent solution starting in 1939, which you can read more about below.

As enjoyable as this article is to read, the most fun part about it might well be the two minutes and forty-five seconds you can spend watching various footage taken of the 1921 World Series in the video embedded within, which includes not only real-time speed footage, but also what can only be characterized as “super slo-mo” footage, which we are now used to seeing for events taking place in 2015 but which look completely and wonderfully anachronistic when seen for events taking place almost a century ago.

This is a fascinating read. Enjoy!


2015-10-27_11-35-36

by James Walker, October 27, 2015 6.09am EDT

This year, FOX Sports paid Major League Baseball about half a billion dollars for the rights to broadcast the national pastime.

While the package includes some playoff games and regular season contests, the crown jewel is still the World Series; despite decades of declining ratings, baseball’s postseason is still a revenue machine.

But World Series radio broadcasts had humble beginnings, which I detail in my recent book Crack of the Bat: A History of Baseball on the Radio.

In fact, for the first 13 World Series broadcasts, radio networks paid zilch to carry the national pastime’s showcase tournament. The broadcasts started as a promotion for a new radio station and coverage was amateurish. In fact, the first voice on the first live broadcast of a World Series didn’t even know the score at the end of one game.

In October 1921, WJZ, a new station based out of Newark, New Jersey, needed a big event to announce its arrival in the New York metro area. The all-Gotham series between the Giants and Yankees (eventually won by the Giants, five games to three) provided the perfect opportunity.

The voice for this first radio World Series belonged to a Westinghouse engineer named Tom Cowan, but its eyes belonged to another. Unlike Cowan, Newark Call newspaper reporter Sandy Hunt was actually at the Polo Grounds.

Footage from the 1921 World Series, which pitted the New York Yankees against the New York Giants.

 

Hunt relayed the plays by telephone to Cowan, who was lodged in a cramped 15-by-20-foot “contractor’s shack” atop Newark’s Edison plant, where the WJZ transmitter was located. In his calls of the games, Cowan simply parroted whatever Hunt told him – mind-numbing work that offered few breaks.

After one exhausting game, Cowan reported he “couldn’t even collect [his] thoughts enough to tell who had won.” When a WJZ colleague asked him who won, he could only say, “I don’t know, I just work here.”

In 1922, the two-person team was replaced by a single eyewitness at the games – and a famous one, at that. Grantland Rice, perhaps the best-known sportswriter of the day, traded in his typewriter for a microphone during the World Series rematch between the Yankees and Giants.

While offering solid description, Rice would occasionally take extended breaks to “rest his voice,” leaving listeners adrift for minutes at a time. Like Cowan, Rice found the new communication medium daunting; he would later tell legendary commentator Red Barber that one radio World Series “was enough for me for all of my life.”

For Grantland Rice, announcing one World Series was enough. irishlegends.com

After these early experiments, National League owners, fearing that broadcasts would hurt World Series attendance, voted to end all World Series coverage. But the new commissioner, a former federal judge named Kenesaw Mountain Landis, overruled them. Landis viewed the nation’s newest mass medium as a potent promotional machine, and developed a policy promoting the widest possible coverage of the games: all stations and networks would be welcomed to cover the games for free.

The next year, 1923, Graham McNamee, a failed singer, became the nation’s first “superstar” sports announcer. For the next several years, he announced the World Series over RCA’s regional network and, later, NBC’s national network. In 1927, CBS joined NBC in providing national radio coverage for the World Series. A third radio network, the Mutual Broadcasting System, would join the fray in 1935.

Interestingly, the networks initially saw coverage of the World Series as a public service, with no sponsors and no commercials. The radio networks supplied the announcers, paid the AT&T line charges and essentially donated airtime to bring the World Series to the nation’s rapidly expanding radio audience.

In the process, Major League Baseball reached a national audience, while the networks became identified with the country’s most popular sport.

However, as attendance and revenues declined in the pit of the Great Depression, Commissioner Landis looked to radio for a new revenue stream.

Over the years, many companies approached the networks with offers to sponsor the World Series. But the networks feared a backlash if the games were broadcast with a commercial sponsor.

Back then, the advertising supported model of broadcasting was not fully entrenched; unlike today, listeners didn’t simply assume commercial interruptions would take place.

Even the pro-business, future Republican president Herbert Hoover thought it “inconceivable that we should allow so great a possibility for [radio] service…to be drowned in advertising chatter.”

As one NBC executive put it, “The minute we begin to commercialize this type of service we will soon have difficulties on our hands from various groups that are not friendly to broadcasting.”

Despite the chance of listener backlash for signing on sponsors, in 1934 Landis went on to sign a US$100,000 deal with the Ford Motor Company to sponsor the World Series.

The players got 42% of the take, and the clubs took the rest. Both parties were overjoyed with the commissioner’s radio windfall. The Ford deal made the World Series too valuable to remain unsponsored, ending the era of sports programming as a public service.

Landis still insisted that the maximum number of networks and stations carry the games, and throughout the 1930s, the World Series saturated the airways each October. Sponsors, however, balked at paying network charges for redundant coverage on multiple networks; by 1938 no sponsor could be found.

Landis quickly adjusted to the changing realities of radio advertising by granting exclusive rights to broadcast and sponsor the event, which would focus the attention of audiences on one network and one company.

In 1939, Landis granted Mutual exclusive rights to broadcast that year’s World Series, with an option for the 1940 contests. Meanwhile, Gillette signed on to sponsor the World Series at a cost of $100,000. But in paying only one network, they dramatically reduced the distribution costs. (Other stations could take the feed if they paid the line charges.)

Gillette would be the official sponsor of the World Series for over 25 years. Digital Deli Online

Mutual would maintain exclusive radio rights until 1957 while Gillette was the exclusive sponsor on radio – and, later, television – until 1966.

Landis’ contract established the modern structure of World Series rights: sponsorship on a single network. Network exclusivity made the games more valuable for the carrying network, but also reduced the radio (and, eventfully, television) footprint of the World Series.

As the NFL exploded in popularity and the number of postseason baseball games and competing television networks rose in the 1980s and 1990s, the supremacy of the World Series in the national consciousness faded. While networks continued to pay higher rights fees to cover the World Series, the television audience for the games declinedfrom a high of 44.3 million viewers in 1978 to a low of 12.7 million in 2012.

When it was unsponsored and on every network, the World Series became the “Fall Classic.” Meanwhile, sponsorship and exclusivity increased revenue beyond Judge Landis’ wildest dreams.

And, fortunately for fans, every announcer since 1921 has known the score at game’s end.

If You’re a Baseball TV Ratings Geek, You Will Really Enjoy This Story

I will totally cop to being a ratings geek.  Even when I was a kid and they would publish local TV or radio ratings once a quarter in the entertainment section of the paper, I would immediately glue myself to the story and memorize the numbers and rankings. I love ratings so much, I selected my college major and career path just so they could be a part of my work.  So when I see an article like Maury Brown’s in Forbes from the other day, it’s like handing me a pound of peanut M&Ms and saying, here you go, chow down.

Brown takes a good look at the Nielsen TV ratings for the 29 clubs based in the U.S. (Toronto is in Canada and thus is not measured by Nielsen, so they’re not included here.) I would recommend you go on over and read his story for yourself, but if you can’t make time, here are a few high points from it:

  • Local baseball telecasts continue to dominate their markets during prime time (defined as 8p-11p Eastern and Pacific, and 7p-10p Central and Mountain). Ten teams rank #1 in their markets, led by Kansas City, St. Louis, Detroit and Pittsburgh. Another six come in at #2 or #3. This is amazing because almost all the telecasts run on cable regional sports networks, which do not have penetration into all the TV households in their markets, yet they routinely outpull even broadcast (aka “over-the-air”) stations in total viewers.
  • If you exclude broadcast stations from the analysis, baseball ranks #1 for 24 of the 25 local TV markets (except only Houston, who are handicapped by having to overcome a horrible TV situation with Comcast Sportsnet  from last year).
  • The Royals are riding their surprise World Series appearance and fast start this year to a +114% ratings increase versus last year, which puts them at the top with an astounding 12.7 household (HH) rating.  This means that 12.7% of all TV HH in Kansas City are tuned to the Royals at any given time. The Royals have both the highest rating and the greatest increase over last.  The Cardinals are second with a 10.2 HH rating. The Tigers (7.7), Pirates (7.6) and Mariners (6.3) round out the top five in ratings.
  • After the Royals, the  Cubs are riding a similar surge in win-loss record, plus exciting new young players, to a similar increase in ratings: +112% over last year, up to 3.1 from 1.5.  The Padres (+52%), Cardinals (+35%) and Nationals (+29%) round out this top five.  On the flip side, the White Sox are disappointing on TV as well as on the field, losing viewers at a -42% clip over 2014.  The Indians (-36%), Braves (-32%), Brewers (-27%) and Reds (-25%) have had similarly horrifying ratings losses, and yet, these latter four teams are still the #1 ratings grabbers in their markets.
  • In terms of total average viewers, big markets rule: The Yankees (206,000) and Mets (180,000) are 1-2, with the Red Sox (146,000), Tigers (141,000) and Cardinals (125,000) coming in at #3 through #5.

Here is the table from the Maury Brown story.  You can click through it to go directly to his story over at Forbes.

h/t Forbes.com and Maury Brown.
h/t Forbes.com and Maury Brown.

Tonight’s Mariner-Yankee Game Will Be the First Game Broadcast in 8K. What Does That Even Mean?

You may have run across this story a couple weeks ago: tonight’s game between the Seattle Mariners and New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium will be broadcast in 8K.

“8K” is a short name for something that might seem somewhat big and confusing to understand, but I will try to explain it in simple terms.

If you already have a standard HD TV, its maximum resolution in pixels is 1920 (in width) x 1080 (in height).  This is the same kind of screen resolution terminology used for your laptop or computer monitor, and you can see what that is right now by going to WhatIsMyScreenResolution.com.  Maybe your computer already uses 1920 x 1080, which would match an HD TV. My laptop comes in at 1600 x 900. The most common computer screen resolution is 1366 x 768.

The next big advancement in screen resolution for TVs is 4K, which has a max resolution of 3840 x 2160. How did they come up with the name “4K”? Because 3840 is close to 4,000; thus, “4K”.  If you like the resolution you get on your current HD TV, you will love the resolution of a 4K TV, which you can see for yourself by going to any store that has an electronics department.

So, you can get a 4K TV today if you want, but you won’t be able to see much 4K content on it. Even though top providers like DirecTV and Comcast’s Xfinity already have 4K boxes customers can obtain, only a few odd movie titles and TV series even offer true 4K, and none of that content includes major networks like ESPN, HBO, USA … or, sadly, anything MLB.  That should change within the next few years, but for now, unless you have too much money sitting around or you crave cutting edge technology, you probably want to wait before buying a 4K TV set.

OK, so, what about 8K? The screen resolution for 8K is 7680 x 4320, which is four times sharper than a 4K resolution, and even though 4K as a technology has fairly recently been released and is probably within a couple of years of widespread adoption, 8K is already nipping on its heels.  In fact, some industry insiders are predicting that 8K is coming on so fast that it won’t even make sense for consumers to get a 4K set, because by the time 4K is ready to become commonplace, something four times as good will be ready to go. (That prediction doesn’t take into account the possibility of a coordinated controlled rollout strategy by electronics manufacturers so they can maximize revenue from 4K technology before they start an 8K rollout, but this isn’t a forum for the discussion on the nature of free markets versus corporate collusion.)

All of which brings us full circle back to tonight’s Mariners-Yankees game: it’s going to be broadcast in 8K. But you and I and everybody else aren’t going to be able to see it, so why bother? They are bothering because they want to gauge the feasibility of broadcasting the game in higher-than-today’s high definition, which includes both 8K and 4K.  Eventually, the new technology will be taken advantage of, so they want to start that evaluation process tonight by viewing an 8K-resolution game in the one Yankee Stadium suite in which it will be available in order to answer the question, “Can this actually be a thing?”

Major League Baseball probably does have a while to think about and work on it, though. Current estimates call for 22 million 4K TV shipments by 2017 and 1 million 8K TV shipments by 2019.  That might sound like a lot, but considering we live in a world with 1.5 billion TV households, including about 116 million in the US, you can see that there is a long way to go before most households will have either one, and most likely not until 2020-something.

So, it will probably be a while before you and I shell out the bucks for something better than the HD sets we have today.  But it’s also good to know what’s coming down the pike, too.

(NOTE: I had to do a significant edit to change the explanation how they arrived at 4K and 8K as an explanation.  As the kids of 1995 like to say, “my bad”.)

Working the Game: An Interview with John Sterling, New York Yankees Radio

In this installment in our “Working the Game” series of interviews, in which we seek to reveal what it is like to work as a baseball media professional on a day-to-day basis, we feature John Sterling, the long-time radio play-by-play announcer for the New York Yankees.

Sterling joined the Yankees broadcast team in 1989 from Atlanta’s John SterlingTBS and WSB Radio, where he called Hawks basketball (1981-89) and Braves games (1982-87). It marked a return to the town where he first hosted a talk show on WMCA from 1971-78, and called the Nets (1975-80, and as a fill-in, in 1997) and Islanders (1975-78) for WMCA, WVNJ, WWOR-TV and SportsChannel. Sterling also previously called Morgan State Football (eight years) and Washington Bullets basketball in 1981. In addition to his seven
years at WMCA and a year at WSB in Atlanta, he has also hosted talk shows on WFAN and WABC in New York. He has not missed a broadcast of any kind since the fall of 1981. Sterling has won a total of 12 Emmy Awards since 2003.

 

When did you become aware that you wanted to seriously pursue a career as a baseball broadcaster?

I knew I wanted to be on the air when I was a little boy. I think when I got to be in my teens, early teens, I realized I wouldn’t be good enough to play pro ball.  So then I just wanted to get on the air.  I knew I was going on the air.  I’m very lucky—I have four kids, and I wonder whether they know what they’re going to do with their lives.  I’m lucky that I knew when I was 9, 10, 11 that I was going on the air. I listened to every disc jockey show, every newscast, every play-by-play of sports.  I loved sports since I was a child.  So even though this helped me in my vocation, it’s also my avocation.  I didn’t have any problems with that.  I knew what I was going to do.

 

What was the first baseball game you ever broadcast, and how did you get that gig?

I’d been on the air a long time.  I did so many things, and any broadcaster does on their way up.  I did, quote-unquote, “a big talk show” in Baltimore, one on radio and one on TV simultaneously.  I started putting sports in my talk show, and then I started filling in on basketball and football with the Bullets and the Colts.  Then I got a big sports talk show in New York, and I did hockey and basketball and football.  I made friends with Tal Smith, who was Gabe Paul’s assistant GM [with the New York Yankees]. So when Tal went to Houston to be president [of the Astros], I called him and said, if there’s ever a chance I can fill in there, I’d love to do it, because I wanted to do baseball.  So the first baseball I did was I did was a weekend in Philadelphia for the Astros.  Then I got to Atlanta and Bob Russler, who’d brought me there, put me on the Braves games in 1983.  That’s the first time I was a regular, and I did radio and TV with the Braves, and then I got to the Yankees in 1989, and I’ve been here ever since.

 

When did you realize you were going to make it—really, truly make it—as a baseball announcer?

With the Braves, I was the junior partner of the four, and we used to rotate innings among us.  Now, Atlanta is a great city; I was unmarried at the time, I had no responsibilities except to myself, and I loved it.  But when I took the Yankee job I took a big chance, because they had a habit of letting announcers go after a couple of years.  But I took the Yankees because I didn’t want to become an old man saying [in stereotypical old drunk’s voice] “Ahh, I shoulda done the Yankees!” So I took the chance and left Atlanta, and it was thrilling to me because now I was the #1 announcer, and I did all nine innings.  I’ve never missed a game in 27 years, but there’s no one point in which you pinch yourself and say, “Wow! I’m doing the Yankees! Gee, I’ve made it as a baseball announcer!”

I’ll tell you this, though: the Yankees were terrible when I first came in. But when Buck Showalter came in, in ’92, and I got Michael Kay as a partner, and the Yankees improved, and I started hearing a lot of what I did on the air come back, I think that is when I realized, “hey, this is really working.”  I never thought I would connect with an audience the way I connect with the Yankee audience.  And then “the Yankees win” and the home run calls became a thing—I didn’t know they were going to become a thing. It just happened to work out.

 

So the home run calls you’re now famous for, you first did those with the Yankees?  You didn’t have that in Atlanta?

Well, the home runs, I first did in Atlanta.  The old ballpark was called “The Launching Pad”, and it was double tiered stadium all the way around, a circular cookie-cutter football-baseball stadium.  So when the ball was hit out, the stands framed it, so you knew right away it was going to be out.  One day Doc Gooden threw Dale Murphy a breaking ball, and Dale hit it, and I could see it right away and that’s when I said “it is high, and it is far, and it is gone.”  I just did it, and that became a home run call.

I always kidded with ballplayers’ names.  When I did the [NBA New jersey] Nets, Bernard King was a big star for them as a rookie, and I called him “Bernard Sky BB King”.  In Atlanta, with Dominique Wilkins [of the NBA Hawks], he would make a great play and I would say, “Dominique is magnifique”.  And the Washington [Wizards of the NBA] coach Randy Wittman, who played for Atlanta, would do something and I would say, “Randy delivers a ‘Wittman’ sampler”.  Just nonsense, but it would catch on.  Now, I never knew it was going to catch on to the point where I would need a home run call for every player.  It began with Bernie Williams and “Bern, baby, Bern” and “Bernie goes boom”.

 

So for every player who comes up to the Yankees, from the very first game, are you thinking to yourself, “OK, I gotta get a home run call for this guy before he actually hits one”?

Well, the newspaper guys give me home run calls, and the fans do, too.  And in the winter, when we pick up a new player, I’m always asked, “well, what’s your home run call going to be for so-and-so?”  It wasn’t supposed to be a cottage industry—well, nothing is supposed to be. I mean, there are no rules.  But it’s a fun thing, and the fans get a kick out of it, and I get a kick out of it. And the players, I might add, also get a kick out of it.

 

Let’s talk about game day: What do you do to prepare for a game before you get to the ballpark?  You wake up in the morning, and you do … what, before the game?

I have a really good answer for this: I have prepared to do a ballgame by being a fan since I was about seven years old.  I do everything that a fan does: I read newspapers—I’m a big newspaper junkie, and I wish they weren’t dying and I wish New York still had eight of them because I’d read them all; I watch SportsCenter; I watch MLB (Network); and don’t forget, I’ve broadcast baseball games since 1983, which is 32, 33 years, so how many games have I broadcast?  And I haven’t missed a game with the Yanks.  So one game prepares you for the next game.   I don’t have to have a checklist of what to do.  So it’s easy.  Very easy.

So, how do I prepare? I’ve been watching baseball since I’m a little boy. Today, in my hotel room, I’m reading the Sunday papers, and I’m switching between the NBA playoff games and MLB. They had the Detroit-Kansas City game on, but they also had their whiparound, where they go game to game, and I love it.

What I don’t want to do is sound like some officious stuffed shirt: “Well, I work very hard, and I get there early, and …” You know, it comes easy to me because I love what I’m doing.   The words come easy, I know the sport inside and out, and I love it.  How could I have made every single game for 27 years if I didn’t love it?

 

How long before a game do you arrive at the ballpark, and is it different at home versus on the road?

On the road, I usually catch the last bus, so I get here very early.  Not as early as most people, but I get here a couple of hours before the game.  At home, I’m driving, so the first thing is, can I get over the bridge?  I live in New Jersey, so that’s the first step.  I try to get there an hour and a half before, something like that.

In the years past, I did the pregame manager’s show.  Joe Torre is a buddy of mine, and I did that the 12 years he was there.  He was just a seat of the pants guy, like I am.  You know how people are described as “anal” or “anal compulsive”?  Well, I’m the opposite.  So I would just grab Joe at some point and just do it.  With Girardi, he was good enough to let me do the same thing.  Some managers have strict rules: “You have to be here at four o’clock!”  But now Suzyn [Waldman, Sterling’s broadcast partner] does the show, so I don’t have a pregame tape. So I could literally … I used to have a radio show in the penthouse of the building I was living in.  Can you imagine that?  So I could go up to work in my pajamas if I wanted to.   But I could literally do the game and no one would notice when I got there, if I lived in the ballpark.  Bill Veeck and his wife used to have an apartment at Sportsmen’s Park in St. Louis, and I read a thing about the Giants had an apartment at the Polo Grounds … anyway, I could get there just before the pregame would start and it would be OK.  But I don’t, I usually get there earlier.  And if I have to talk with a player or talk with the manager, I will.

 

What are the key things you do at the ballpark before the game starts?

You know, it’s much easier than you’re making it out.  You’ve been to the press box—they give you more information than you can use.  Don’t forget, I’ve just done a game last night, so that prepares you for today.  I write down my lineups, and … well, that’s it.  Then you broadcast the game.  I broadcast by the seat of my pants, and that works for me.  Someone else brings a big bag of media guides and rule books and stopwatches and all that stuff. I don’t do that.  I have a very little baseball bag in which I carry pens and phone numbers and hard candy.  I have a very little bag.  That’s worked for me.

 

So while the broadcast is in progress, is everything super easy for you?  Or is there, say, one thing you do where you can say, “this is the hardest thing I have to do during the game”?  Is there anything like that at all?

No.  I hate rain delays because you’re sitting around.  I hate these eight o’clock Sunday night games because you’re always flying someplace afterwards. But everyone hates the Sunday night ESPN games, it’s so late. You know why I’m lucky? I told you earlier in this conversation, I’ve been able to combine my avocation and vocation.  I started out as a disk jockey because I love music.  I know as much about music, American popular standards and Broadway, as I do about baseball.  These are the two things that have occupied my mind my entire life.

 

What do you do in between innings and during the seventh inning stretch?

Go to the bathroom.  Everyone does, because in Yankee Stadium they sing “God Bless America”, then “Take Me Out To The Ball Game”, so we have a little more time.

 

What are some common pitfalls to avoid while broadcasting baseball games?  Or is it smooth sailing the whole time?

Everything I do is off the cuff, and the people I’ve worked with, Suzyn and Michael Kay, have worked that way with me.  I call every pitch of every game, and I don’t find it [to be] work.  We’re very busy.  I’m sure you’ve heard it—we have a million drop-ins, and we have a lot of stuff to get in, like scoreboards.  I don’t try to figure out what I’m going to say, I just say it.  I don’t know how you can do sports and figure out what you’re going to do.  You have to react to what’s on the field.

Curt Gowdy once said—he was preparing for the first Super Bowl, and he was nervous as hell because there were all these network people in the booth—he took himself out for a little walk. And he said to himself, “Look, you’ve been doing this all your life! Just follow the ball!” I just know the game by osmosis—look how many baseball games I’ve done. So I don’t have to figure out what I have to say.   I just open my big fat mouth and say it.

 

When the team has a day off, how do you spend your time?

Oh, that’s easy.  I entertain myself very well.  I swim for exercise—my knees are shot from all those years on hard courts playing tennis and basketball.  I get up late.  I have a healthy brunch of fruit and coffee and read the papers. That’s how I prepare, see? I have ESPN SportsCenter on and MLB [Network] on.  That’s how I prepare! See, what I’m trying to tell you: I don’t try to prepare.  I love what I do, so I find it very easy.

 

When you’re traveling with the team, what is your favorite thing to do on the road?

Not much.  I don’t sightsee.  You know how much I’ve travelled? [Laughs] If I’m off, and someone is appearing in town that I love, like—I have to figure out someone who’s alive now—if Tony Bennett or Vic Damone was somewhere, I’d go see them, or if there’s a Broadway play, probably a musical, in that town, I would go to see that if I have a day off.  But for the most part it’s work.  The average day is, I get up late, have a healthy brunch, swim for exercise, read the papers, watch ESPN and MLB, shave and shower, make myself beautiful, then go to the ballpark.

 

How do you spend time over the All-Star break?

With my kids, I have four kids.  That’s one time we get together.  They range from 14 to 17 in age.

 

And the same thing during the offseason?  Do you do any broadcasting in the offseason?

Yeah, I don’t do talk shows or play-by-play or voiceovers or appearances.  I’m pretty busy because I have the great ability to entertain myself.  I’m very lucky: I have a very good life, and I live it very, very well.

 

What baseball announcers do you most admire, both retired and currently active, and why?

If you said to me, “Who’s your favorite singer”, well, obviously it would be Sinatra.  But I must like a hundred different singers.  I like different people for different reasons.  I think [Vin] Scully is the best, but I don’t want you to think it’s only Scully.  I loved Mel Allen; I loved Bob Prince; I love Harry Caray; I loved Skip Caray.  All guys who are different—every one of them is different.  Every broadcaster brings his own style, and there isn’t [only] one style that’s acceptable.

This is really true: every broadcaster I have met in any sport helps the other broadcasters.  Everybody gets along, and if you need something, you go to the other broadcasters.  There are no egos, and there’s tremendous camaraderie among the fraternity.  Especially now with interleague and you don’t see these [teams], if you go to one of their broadcasters with questions, they’ll give you everything. In this vein, when that fire destroyed my home this winter, I heard from everyone in the business.  It was very heartwarming.

 

What are some of the things, or maybe even the one big thing, you wish ordinary fans knew about your job?

That it’s very easy to do, and very tough to get.  That’s the broadcast business [in general].

 

If you were the King of Baseball Announcing and you could make any changes or improvements to the broadcasting profession, what would they be?

I would eliminate broadcast positions like this one in Washington where you’re so far away and so high that it’s very tough to see everything.  I would make all broadcast positions great.  And I would make the ballparks small.   Everyone who built an enormous ballpark—Detroit, San Diego, Seattle, and the Mets—they’ve all shortened the distances.  People want to see runs and home runs and doubles off the wall and guys running around the bases, or at least I do.  I like offense in every sport.  That’s about it.  And I would have the National League use the DH.

 

Well, John, really, thank you very much for your time.  You’ve given me a tremendous amount to work with.  Would you like me to share the link to the article with you via email, to make sure I’ve gotten everything right?

No.  I don’t have an email address, unfortunately.  Well, for me it’s fortunate!

A Bevy of Hall of Famers Did Baseball Radio Work in 1939, and Here’s the Proof

Committee member Bill Dunstone has shared with us this terrific find: an article, first published in the Sporting News in 1939, about former ballplayers who were set to take the booth that season, after having taken the field for various teams for so many seasons previous to that.  The best part of this picture, to us, is that no fewer than five of the players pictured here are Hall of Famers.

We can positively identify this as being from 1939 since that is the only year Walter Johnson, arguably the greatest pitcher in the history of the game and the only player/broadcaster here that was already in the Hall (elected in its inaugural class in 1936), did the radio broadcasts for the Washington Senators for WJSV.

Two other future Hall of Famers in this picture who were doing play by play in 1939 were Harry Heilmann (Tigers on WXYZ; he broadcast for the team from 1934 to 1950), and Frankie Frisch (doing Red Sox and Bees games on WAAB; he also did Giants games on TV and radio in 1947 and 1948).  Frisch was voted into the Hall in 1947; Heilmann was elected in 1952.

The final two Hall of Famers pictured here were doing studio work that season.  Waite Hoyt, selected by the Veterans’ Committee in 1969, did pregame broadcasts for the Yankees and Giants on WABC in 1939, but later he would do radio play by play for the Reds from 1942 to 1965.  Freddie Lindstrom, a Veterans’ Committee selection in 1976, spent the season in question working at WLS in Chicago.

Even though the pictures of the men themselves is very grainy, the accompanying story is very legible.  Thank you, Bill, for sharing this with us!

If you, too, have any interesting artifacts, such as pictures, stories, video files, audio files or anything of the like, please feel free to contact us so we can share them with our readership as well.

Click on the thumbnail image below to open a new tab and view it in its full size glory.  (You may need to click the picture in the new tab once more to make it full size.)

1939 Ex-Player Broadcasters

News Bites for January 26, 2015

Wildcats lose play-by-play voice Chris Graham; WNC baseball looks for new broadcaster: Chris Graham, who has called the games for the Western Nevada College baseball team for eight years, is leaving the voluntary post for a full-time job with the Nevada legislature.  If you have your own broadcasting equipment and have a deep understanding of baseball, contact Coach DJ Whittemore at (775) 445-3250 to apply.

Auburn Doubledays hire an operations manager, play-by-play voice: The nascent New York-Penn League franchise has hired David Lauterbach, a senior at Syracuse University, as their play-by-play voice.  Lauterbach worked the games for the Falmouth Commodores of the Cape Cod Baseball League for the past two seasons.

Headrick joins RailRiders broadcast team: The Yankees’ Triple A affiliate in Scranton-Wilkes Barre has hired Darren Headrick as color announcer alongside play-by-play guy John Sadakon on both radio and television game broadcasts.  Headrick previously did PxP for the indians’ Advanced A affiliate Carolina Mudcats, and was named 2013 Carolina League Broadcaster of the Year.

Welcome Liebhaber to the radio booth: The Jackson Generals radio booth, that is.  Brandon Liebhaber is a 22-year-old graduate of Northwestern University.  The Generals, who play in the Southern League, are the Double A affiliates of the Mariners. Liebhaber has previously announced in the Cape Cod league and for the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes of the California League.

Royals’ Matthews on pace of play: Keep hitter in batter’s box, call a strike a strike: As the Royals’ TV PxP announcer, Denny Matthews has a definite opinion about pace of play.

Bye Bye, Bud: Selig Left His Mark On Baseball: Say what you want about the guy.  Whether you love him or hate him, either way, you gotta admit it: the reign of Bud Selig has been very positive for the growth of baseball media.

 

Breaking: Yankees, WPIX-TV Close to Deal (Daily News)

WPIX, channel 11, was the home to the Yankees from 1952 all the way through to 1998, but the Daily News says the Yanks may be coming back home.

The Mets are already there, so it may be a challenge for the station to work out a schedule to avoid a conflict between the two, but WGN in Chicago has managed to carry the Cubs and White Sox simultaneously without tripping over their own feet, so it can be done.

Read more here:

YES Network close to deal with WPIX-TV to put some Yankees games on Ch. 11

UPDATE 1/23/15: The official announcement came down yesterday saying that there will be “about 20” games broadcast on WPIX in 2015.