Here is the Actual 1939 Contract That Ended the Baseball Broadcast Moratorium For Good

Yesterday we posted a 1932 article published by the Sporting News revealing the results of a poll the paper took of their readers as to the latter’s feelings about broadcasting games live on the radio.  Almost 260,000 votes were cast, with the Sporting News concluding that public opinion in favor of live broadcasts was “practically unanimous”.

This overwhelming fan sentiment did not prevent eight of the sixteen teams from banning broadcasts of their games by local radio stations the following season.  (In fact, the Indians ended up dropping radio in 1933 before picking it up again for the 1934 campaign.) But eventually the teams and the leagues did come to see the light, and that light led them to enter into the Major League Broadcasting Agreement just prior to the 1939 season.

So, what did this Major League Broadcasting Agreement actually look like?  What were its provisions, and what practices did it allow and forbid?  Fortunately for us, this is something we can see for ourselves, thanks to the miracle that is the Internet.  Goldin Auctions, a company that conducts auctions of sports memorabilia, had conducted one consisting specifically of baseball documents this past August, and which included a signed copy of this 1939 broadcasting agreement, complete with original signatures from representatives of all 16 clubs, including many club presidents who are still well-known today.

A certificate of authentication included with the auction lot indicated that the agreement was executed on 20 copies, each signed by all 16 team representatives, and the web page on which the auction was conducted indicates that the winner paid $23,800 to add the document to his or her collection.

However, the best part about all of this is that there are .JPG files for each page of the document on that web page.  You can go there and peruse the entire agreement if you like—or you can simply click on the images below to see and read the document.

Having read the agreement myself, I am struck by how short and simple it is by today’s standards.  Even allowing for names of the participating parties and for definition of terms, it looks like they were able to bring in the entire agreement under 2,000 words. By contrast, the iTunes Store terms and Conditions yawns on interminably for over 20,000 words.

Secondly, there are several interesting aspects to the agreement that I think are worth mentioning here:

  • The agreement prevented a team from broadcasting its games on any radio stations located within fifty miles of any other team’s stadium.
  • In two-team cities, the agreement prevented one team from broadcasting any of its games as long as the other team was playing a home game, at least until that other team’s game had concluded.
  • The New York Giants and New York Yankees together constituted a two-team territory, but the Brooklyn Dodgers, only about a dozen miles away and even then technically located within New York City for the prior 40 years, constituted its own one-team territory.  So, if the Giants were away and the Yankees were at home, the Giants could not broadcast its away game (and vice versa, of course).  However, if the Giants and the Yankees were both away, the Giants could broadcast its away game even if the Dodgers were playing a home game.
  • The agreement specified that ball clubs could broadcast only between 550 and 1600 on the AM band, but specifically forbade broadcasting on shortwave or other “high frequency” stations.  (FM was not contemplated because the first FM station in a major league city did not sign on until that November.)
  • The agreement defined “broadcasting” as including not only radio, but telephone.
  • The corporate name of the New York Giants was the very bland-sounding “National Exhibition Company” and were, in fact, incorporated in New jersey.  And the best part of that is, they maintained this corporate name long after they moved to San Francisco!

After this agreement was signed onto, no baseball team ever again refused to broadcast its games live for any reason other than financial. (As it happens, both the Giants and Yankees did not air their games during the 1941 and 1943 seasons due to inability to sell broadcasting rights for what they deemed to be their minimum asking price).

Click on any of the images below to open them in a new tab.  Enjoy!

 

16927_Cover

16927_1 16927_2-3 16927_4-5 16927_6-7 16927_8-916927_10

One thought on “Here is the Actual 1939 Contract That Ended the Baseball Broadcast Moratorium For Good”

  1. “both the Giants and Yankees did not air their games during the 1941 and 1943 seasons”

    That would mean that Yankee games were not on radio during DiMaggio’s 56 game hitting streak. Is that correct?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *